Ukraine medics removing red crosses from uniforms to avoid targeting by Russian forces, charity says

Frontline medical workers in Ukraine are being targeted by enemy fire more than in any other war and are considered ‘high-value targets’ by Russian forces, according to a humanitarian charity.

MedixforUkraine, which trains combat medical staff, claims they are being specifically targeted, being forced to remove red crosses from their uniforms and being deliberately attacked by Putin’s troops. Is.

The World Health Organization has recorded 703 attacks on hospitals and medical facilities since February.

This is believed to be more than the number of Russian strikes detected in Syria in 10 years.

Doctors carry the body of a victim found under rubble during nighttime shelling in Mykolaiv, Ukraine

Doctors carry the body of a victim found under rubble during nighttime shelling in Mykolaiv, Ukraine

Professor Mark Hannaford, the charity’s founder, said: ‘Physicians are particularly targeted by the occupying forces and are considered high-value targets.

‘This is happening in Ukraine more than any other conflict I can remember. This puts him in the firing line while trying to save the lives of those wounded in battle. This is probably one of the most dangerous posts in the front line.

He said UK volunteers with combat medical experience lead convoys of urgently needed medical supplies.

Deliberately firing on medics wearing recognizable insignia is considered a war crime under the Geneva Conventions.

It comes amid continued attacks on civilian infrastructure across Ukraine, leaving millions without power as heavy snowfall blankets Kyiv and the country’s east with further freezing cold.

President Volodymyr Zelensky said six million people were without power on Friday after Russian missile bombardments this week.

The World Health Organization has recorded 703 attacks on hospitals and medical facilities since February.  Image: A Ukrainian soldier injured in fighting with Russian soldiers is given medical aid at a hospital in the city of Mykolaiv

The World Health Organization has recorded 703 attacks on hospitals and medical facilities since February. Image: A Ukrainian soldier injured in fighting with Russian soldiers is given medical aid at a hospital in the city of Mykolaiv

A Ukrainian official compared Russia’s efforts to cut off civilians to ‘genocide’ tactics used by Joseph Stalin, as Kyiv recalled the Soviet-era famine that killed millions of Ukrainians in the winter of 1932-33 Had gone.

Moscow claims its attacks on energy infrastructure are the result of Kyiv being unwilling to negotiate, with the Kremlin insisting it does not target civilian populations.

Last week, a newborn baby died at a hospital in Vilnyansk in Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhya region after a Russian airstrike hit the building.

Officials say the child’s mother and the doctor had a narrow escape after being pulled from the debris.

The Foreign Office said last week that Russia was deliberately bombing hospitals and other medical facilities.

Lukasz Fajt, a former firefighter in Inverurie, Aberdeenshire, who now lives in Poland, volunteers for Medics4Ukraine and has played a major role in helping to set up training for Ukrainian forces.

‘The life-saving skills I learned with the fire service in Aberdeenshire and later as an offshore industry safety instructor have inspired me to train hundreds of Medics4Ukraine combat medics,’ he said.

Red Cross workers carry medical supplies by boat across a reservoir next to a bridge destroyed by shelling in the settlement of Stary Saltiv, Kharkiv region, earlier this month.

Red Cross workers carry medical supplies by boat across a reservoir next to a bridge destroyed by shelling in the settlement of Stary Saltiv, Kharkiv region, earlier this month.

‘Ukrainian combat medics are now taking off their uniforms for fear of being recognised. This increases their chances of survival.

‘I am very pleased to have played my part in helping to make possible the training for combat medics in Ukraine.

‘I spent eight years as a crew manager in Inverurie between 2007 and 2015 before moving on to work in health and safety training in the offshore industry.’

Medics4Ukraine says the former firefighter was instrumental in setting up the training of hundreds of Ukrainian combat medics.

Trainer and UK paramedic Luca Alfatti said: ‘They made it possible for us to have contacts and routes to train combat medics in Lviv.

‘The need to save the people and the army is great. In one training session we were told there would be 20 and 100 would come.

‘Those we train also teach life-saving skills to others.’

The organization has provided Ukraine with medical training and life-saving equipment worth over £1.1 million.

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